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Being a centre of a competition, which is gripping for people from all around the world, is a tremendous boost for a promotion of the place.

I wanted to address here that the competion is gripping, not the whole "Being a centre of a competition". So, it does not seem to convey my thought, I guess. Maybe without "which"?

Being a centre of a competition gripping for people from all around the world is a tremendous boost for a promotion of the place.

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Your supposition about using the second form of the sentence is correct.

What you're actually doing is not just removing which but turning the nonrestrictive clause into a restrictive clause. This removes ambiguity by forcing the phrase to apply to something specific.


Another way to express it is it to break it into two sentences:

Some competitions are gripping for people from all around the world. Being the centre of such a competition is a tremendous boost for the promotion of the place.

(I also used a definite article in front of centre and promotion since it sounds more natural.)


But if I were to interpret what your sentence actually means, I would likely phrase it differently:

Being the host city of a gripping, worldwide competition promotes the city tremendously.

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I don’t think either of those sentences is very clear.

Part of the problem is with the phrase “gripping for people from all around the world.” With or without the which, it’s just too much verbiage between the subject and the predicate. (There is nothing “ungrammatical” about it, but the sentence feels bloated and clumsy.)

I’d suggest something more like:

Being a centre of such a popular, gripping competition will promote this place tremendously.

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