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The phrase

Michael, born and bred in London, is a scientist from Cambridge.

is clear. He was born and I grew up in that city (I do not know the origins of the word bred, but I trust it to mean grew up).

Now, imagine that he was born in one city but grew up in another:

Michael, born in London and bred in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

  • Question 1: Is this allowed? May I split up the usually fixed phrase born and bred like this?

Since I wasn't sure that this was allowed I tried working with an alternative to bred. Such alternative would be grow up in its past tense. Some suggestions would be:

Michael, born in London and grew up in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

Michael, born in London and grown up in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

But I am in doubt here. This does not seem correct by far.

  • Question 2: Are any of these versions with grew up or grown up correct, or would something else fit?

How would the perfect sentence be?

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"Born and bred" is a phrase where "bred" in the Oxford Dictionary is given as

past and past participle of breed

adjective

[usually in combination] (of a person or animal) reared in a specified environment or way

But outside of the original phrase it does not seem right to use the term bred on people; it sounds as though they were a scientific experiment although we do say

Michael, born in London and Paris-bred, is a scientist from Cambridge.

Of your two suggestions

Michael, born in London and grew up in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

Michael, born in London and grown up in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

the first is reasonable but a bit stilted, and the second doesn't work well. My suggested sentence is

Michael, born in London and raised in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

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"Born and bred" is a particular phrase (that can't be split up in any meaningful way) meaning that someone comes from, grew up in and is somehow "typical" for the particular place. Your understanding of "born and bred" misses the implied sense of having the 'nature' of that place.

For example Cambridge defines it as:

used to say that someone was born and grew up in a particular place, and has the typical character of someone who lives there: [e.g.] He's a Parisian born and bred.

In other words "born and bred" in Someplace means that you come from (by birth and upbringing) and in some way have the 'true nature' that would be expected of someone who comes from that place. You might imagine what a typical person from 'Paris' who was born there and raised in a typical Parisian way would be like, for example.

Think of a specific town, city (even a particular street within a town, in some cases) in your experience where you could characterise people "who come from that place" in your mind. Someone "born and bred" in that place would fit that image (in your mind, or could be stated by themselves if they are proud of that place).

You wouldn't use "bred" by itself for the reasons that @Weather-Vane stated.

You could re-word that sentence to: Michael, who was born in London [and/but] grew up in Paris, is a scientist from Cambridge.

I say [and/but] as you would generally say "and" as a neutral statement of where he was born and where he grew up, or "but" if you are specifically contrasting them (e.g. I was born in London but grew up in America = drawing attention to the "difference" between the two.)

  • Commenting because it isn't really part of the answer, but an instance of this "in the wild" I encountered was with a colleague who comes from Place X where "intimate relations with family" are sort of the stereotype there. I asked where this guy lives and another colleague who was there said "Oh he's from Place X, born and bred!" with the ambiguous meaning of 'bred' there. He wasn't happy! – seventyeightist Feb 7 at 20:16

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