2

Here is the context:

Introduce yourself to people who you don't want to date but you are willing to. Here are my reasons: one, you may be off on someone who you think is right for you. Open all the doors, see who walks through.

Does it mean that someone dosn't like the person whom he/she thinks is right for her/him?

3

"Be off on" in this context means to "be wrong about" or "be mistaking about".

What the writer is trying to say is: "You often think someone is right for you but later (when dating) it turns out that you are not actually right for each other, causing a breakup. In the same way it is likely that you would think someone is not "right for you" but it would turn out that they actualy are after you started dating."

  • I don't agree with the authors logical conclusions, but that is beside the point of the answer – rasan076 Feb 8 at 18:01
  • 2
    Consider FumbleFingers' comment (which I agree with). This is a non-standard use of be off on - it's not someone that you're off on; it's your judgement of that person that's off. In other words, the author probably should have written, "your opinion about someone may be off" or "you may be off in your opinion about someone." – Juhasz Feb 8 at 18:28
  • Be off in someone's opinion about someone mean to have the wrong opinion, doesn' it? – Dmytro O'Hope Feb 8 at 18:55
3

"be off on someone" would probably mean something like "be wrong about someone."

Introduce yourself to people who you don't want to date but you are willing to. Here are my reasons: one, you may be wrong about someone who you think is right for you. Open all the doors, see who walks through.

It's a bit of an awkward sentence, but the point is: introduce yourself to a lot of people, you might be surprised - you might think someone is or isn't right for you, and you might be wrong / a little off (as in "off the mark").

0

I think it means that someone might be overly attracted by someone whom he thinks is right for him.

Personally I'm not familiar with the expression, "be off on someone" in that context.

From the rest of his statement, it is clear the author is advising people to be very open about who they connect with, and to introduce yourself even to people you don't immediately think are "right" for you.

This makes me think his intended meaning of "to be off on someone" is "to be preoccupied with s/o", or "to be chasing off after s/o". He cautions that you may be likely to chase off after someone who you think is right for you [... but you may overlook someone who actually is right for you].

Judging from other people's comments here, I wonder if this expression might be rare, regional, or even the author's personal invention.

  • That was my mistake. She said "Here are my..." – Dmytro O'Hope Feb 8 at 20:55

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