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  1. Near-term sentiment has shifted to the euro, amid market expectations that the Federal Reserve will put brakes on raising rates.
  2. Near-term sentiment has shifted to the euro, amid market expectation that the Federal Reserve will put brakes on raising rates.

Is one of the above sentences more appropriate than the other?

1 Answer 1

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The first of your sentences is probably from the article Heraeus Precious Forecast 6th February 2019;

Near-term sentiment has shifted to the euro, amid market expectations that the Federal Reserve will stop raising rates. However, US job numbers are still good, so one more rate rise is possible which would benefit the dollar. Additionally, economic growth seems to be slowing more in Europe than in the US, which also favours dollar strength this year, since the ECB will most likely delay making its first rate rise.


amid (prep; in the middle of or surrounded by) is either followed by a plural-countable noun, a collective noun, or an uncountable noun. For example;

a brief moment of levity amid the solemn proceedings

Her office was an oasis of peace and sanity amid the surrounding chaos.

The town sits amid gentle hills and dense forest.

The actors made their bows amid great applause.

The president cancelled his visit amid speculation that his health was failing.

Following is an example from https://sentence.yourdictionary.com/amid;

There, amid a cluster of floats, Boy Scouts and ballerinas, four of Fred's lady friends were in the final stages of hanging bunting about a beautiful old touring car whose vintage or name Dean couldn't identify.

Therefore, your version of the original sentence, the second one, is incorrect.

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    "amid market expectation" may be OK, if you consider that expectation is a bunch of smaller expectations - but I recommend to use the fully correct "amid market expectations"
    – virolino
    Feb 13, 2019 at 9:58
  • @virolino if someone means what you think to be considered for the singular one to be correct, they need to add 'a bunch of' otherwise that'd be a mistake because the reader won't know what the writer means. There are, however, cases like "Men have unrealistic expectations about how women should look." where singular 'expectation' would also be fine with a different context or a slightly different meaning. Feb 13, 2019 at 10:14
  • As you said, amid (prep; in the middle of or surrounded by) is either followed by a plural-countable noun, a collective noun, or an uncountable noun. Why can't expectation be regarded as uncountable here? Feb 13, 2019 at 12:42

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