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Sometimes, I confuse a little bit about the position of "appositive".

The competitive environment is increasingly complexe and unpredictable , demanding flexibility and quick response to its chellenges.

vs

The competitive environment, demanding both flexibility and quick response to its challenges, is increasingly complex and unpredictable.

Is "demanding both flexibility and quick response to its challenges" appositive here?

Thanks to you.

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demanding both flexibility and quick response to its challanges

No: this is not a noun phrase, but a gerund-participial clause serving as an adjunct, so it cannot be an appositive.

Appositives are specifying noun phrases that either modify another noun phrase or act as a supplement:

We went to see [the opera 'Carmen']. (appositive NP as modifier)

Bizet's most famous opera, 'Carmen', was first performed in 1875. (appositive NP as supplement)

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The appositive serves to identify the other noun phrase, not just to describe it. The noun phrase "demanding both flexibility and quick response to its challenges" does not identify anything; it is characteristics that are being applied to "the competitive environment".

Identification doesn't have to be by name or anything, it can be via a superlative ('the largest cake', 'the messiest eater'), by relationship, and various other things that might seem like description - because they are; but in so describing, they identify. Your example is describing without identifying.

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