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Engineers made several improvements in precision in recent years.

I think "in" sounds more natural, but I would also be inclined to use "to". Are both phrasing equivalent, and why?

closed as off-topic by J.R. Feb 27 at 16:29

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Engineers made several improvements in precision in recent years.

  • make precision improvements OR
  • to make improvements to precision: to make improvements to [something] OR
  • to make improvements in automation or construction [field of study or field of activity]

precision is not a field of study, so it doesn't work here.

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