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“Now. I’m an artisan,” he said. “Like a cat who makes – tables. I don’t like the word artist. Maybe I never did. I sure the fuck don’t know what it means. I’m a cat who works from his balls, with his hand. I know what it’s about now. I think I really do. Even if I go under. But I don’t think I will. Now.”

It's from James Baldwin's "If Beale Street Could Talk"

At the end of the paragraph, the character is saying "But I don’t think I will. Now." I didn't quite understand what he wouldn't do. Is it art that he wouldn't do? Or the character is just talking nonsense at that moment?

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“Now. I’m an artisan,” he said. “Like a cat who makes – tables. I don’t like the word artist. Maybe I never did. I sure the fuck don’t know what it means. I’m a cat who works from his balls, with his hand. I know what it’s about now. I think I really do. Even if I go under. But I don’t think I will. Now.”

The last main verb is: go under, which means to fail at something.

The auxiliary "will" goes with that verb: I don't think I will [go under or fail].

This is a good example of how auxiliary verbs are used in conversation. You don't need to repeat the main verb and can have an entire conversation with auxiliaries.

Here is my own example:

John: I really wanted to go ski-diving but the ski-diving school was closed.
Mary: You did? Why would you? It's scary and dangerous.
John: Yes, that's true. But even so, I would. That's what makes it exciting.
Mary: It does? Wow. Well, some people love danger.
John: They do, they really do. People like me. For sure.
Mary: Well, I never have and never will.

There are two main verbs in that paragraph and the auxiliaries go with them. [I think I pointed them out correctly. :)]

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