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The single most importante thing to remember is that there is no good way to do a talk. The most memorable talks offer something fresh, something no one has seen before. The worst ones are those that feel formulaic. So do not on any account try to emulate every piece of advice. I've offered here. Take the bulk of it on board, for sure. But make the talk your own. You know what's distinctive about and your idea. Play to your strenghts and give a talk that is truly authentic to you.

"So do not on any account" can be rephrased as:

A) All in all, for no purpose

B) No matter what

C) However, never

D) Therefore, do not, for any reason

P.S.>I understood by the meaning that the nearest alternatives are C and D. But, I am doubtful in alternative D on the difference between "for no reason" or "for any reason" in this context of the text.

  • It's worth noting that this usage also still occurs in contexts such as I like him on account of he makes me laugh (where it means because, for the reason that). It doesn't have much to do with "purpose", except indirectly through (explanatory, justifying) "reason". – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 13 at 18:48
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It would appear that your actual question is about the difference between "for no reason" and "for any reason."

When you use "no" in a sentence like that, you are negating what comes next. So it's valid to say:

For no reason should you try to emulate...

Note that this could also be written in a shorter way, but this sounds a little odd to me:

For no reason try to emulate...

However, in the latter there is no negation so it's added with the use of "not" in a rearranged sentence:

You should not, for any reason, try to emulate...

  • What I understood from your answer. The correct alternative is d. The use of "any" is correct, because when using the phrase in the negative (do not or do not), "any" is used. For example: Do it, for no reason at all and Do not do it, for any reason at all. So (synonym) = Therefore, Do not (synonym), For any reason (because of negative phrase). – Destiny Feb 13 at 18:57

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