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I read a sentence which was:

Mr Prasad said the unicast avoids of all shortcomings of the existing methods.

Is it correct to use "of" with "avoid"? I think we use "of" with "devoid".

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That sentence is better read:

Unicast avoids all shortcomings of the existing methods.

So, yeah, better to avoid the "of" with "avoid"

  • "better read" is a very appropriate turn of phrase. Despite the fact the title warned me that the question was about the word "of", I omitted the word "of" the first time I read the example sentence. (I speak American English, and I have taken a speed-reading class.) – Jasper Feb 13 '19 at 17:21
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    "better" is an understatement! OP's use of of is completely unacceptable to all native Anglophones. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 13 '19 at 18:34
  • @FumbleFingers - That specific instance sounds off, yes. But the word of can still be used idiomatically if we reorder the words: Mr Prasad said the unicast avoids all of the shortcomings of existing methods. – J.R. Feb 13 '19 at 18:41
  • @Jasper - what do you mean by "better read is a very appropriate turn of phrase? – user81138 Feb 14 '19 at 2:44
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    @VishalGhulati -- A "turn of phrase" is a way of saying something. In this context, "very appropriate" means "well-chosen" or "true in multiple ways". I think that Bhaskaran MU meant "the following example is better than the original post's example", which is true. But as I noted, a native speaker might literally try to read the original example and only say the words in the following example. So there are at least two ways that Bhaskaran's statement is true. – Jasper Feb 14 '19 at 5:35

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