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I would like to know the correct way to express that the new methods can be applied to different areas and not to a specific filed.

For example,

The developed approaches can be applied to several applications and not restricted to a specific area.

or

The developed approaches can be used in several applications and not restricted to a specific area.

Which one is explain my idea better?

  • For what it's worth, I'd write: The new methods can be applied to several applications without restriction. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Feb 15 '19 at 4:12
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As a native speaker of American English I prefer your first example. An approach can be applied to an application.

If you want to use the verb 'to use' I would suggest

The developed approaches can be used in several situations...

I would also suggest that you say in both cases that the approaches '...need not be restricted...'

The developed approaches can be applied to several applications and need not be restricted to a specific area.

  • 1
    as a non-native English speaker, "the developed approaches" has "bad music" (although grammatically correct). I would prefer Maryam's own words in the description: "new methods" - or something similar. What do you think? Thank you. – virolino Feb 14 '19 at 5:57
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    Yes, I see what you mean @virolino. It's a bit awkward possibly because it's past participle serving as an adjective. If there were context setting up the relationship it might flow more easily - if previous sentences were talking about developing the approaches, then the 'developed approaches' would have been introduced already and be a familiar subject. You could also make it prettier by saying, 'The approaches that have been developed...', or by using a different phrase, as you suggest. – dwilli Feb 14 '19 at 6:11
  • thank you. While reading, I thought that even "These developed approaches ..." sounds better. Which leads to the same conclusion, that the "sound" is related to the missing context. – virolino Feb 14 '19 at 6:17

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