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Operator for new marinas in A and existing B marinas for boats

Which meaning is correct for the sentence above?

Operator for (new marinas in A for boats) and (existing B marinas for boats)

or

Operator for (new marinas in A) and (existing B marinas for boats)

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    maybe this doesn't matter, but what are A and B? the names of towns? put in fake town names instead? Then the sentence doesn't flow particularly well "existing San Diego marinas for boats"... – Sam Feb 16 at 9:34
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That sentence is, as you observe, ambiguous. It could be disambiguated with commas.

Operator for new marinas in A, and existing B marinas, for boats.

That corresponds with your first parse.

Operator for new marinas in A, and existing B marinas for boats.

That may still be read as ambiguous, but is more pointing towards your second parse.

  • I don't think the commas really serve to disambiguate the two meanings that clearly in your examples. What about operator for new boat marinas in A and existing ones in B? I don't know if boat marina is a thing. If it is, you could also say operator for new marinas in A and existing boat marinas in B to express the other meaning. – userr2684291 Feb 16 at 17:40
  • I'm very confident that the two-comma version removes the ambiguity. The one-comma version, not do much. You can disambiguate better by rephrasing, but the question is about what the given sentence means, so sentences that are very different wouldn't seem to be actually addressing the question. – SamBC Feb 16 at 17:43
  • Of course, only using the second comma and not the first would also remove that ambiguity. – SamBC Feb 16 at 17:45

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