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In a movie I have just watched, the following sentence appeared after a guy was kidnapped:

Guys, you got me confused with somebody else..

I understand that but at the same time, I am not sure what usage of "get" is that, even after I have gone through all dictionary entries for this word, so I guess it is quite informal. Why not just "you confused me with somebody else" or "you must have confused me with somebody else...".

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"Get" is often used transitively in casual conversation to mean "cause to become". You have got me scared; he has got me worried. The conversational tone was, presumably, considered appropriate by the scriptwriters. It is in Oxford Dictionary's list of meanings for "get":

3 Reach or cause to reach a specified state or condition.

Get (Oxford)

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  • I only know that in examples like "he got fat" or "he got scared", which I can rephrase as "he became fat" or "he became scared". In this example, though, it does not seem to work that way. In your examples, is "has" necessary?
    – John V
    Feb 17 '19 at 21:06
  • "Has" may or may not be necessary, depending on whether the simple past (he got me worried last Tuesday; I am not still worried) or present perfect (he has got me worried in the last ten minutes; I am still worried) is being used. These are often ignored in casual speech, as in your example. Feb 17 '19 at 22:40
  • Thanks. As "get sth" done has also the meaning of arranging that somebody does something for you, could "He got me scared" understood like this: he hired some thugs to scare me on my way from work. ?
    – John V
    Feb 18 '19 at 6:44
  • "He got me scared" is sufficiently ambiguous that I would prefer something like "he hired some thugs to scare me". Feb 18 '19 at 17:25

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