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I hear both the expressions:

  1. I am passing my life helping others.
  2. I am passing my life by helping others.

Do the both carry equivalent meaning ? Please explain.

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    Pass my time, or Pass the time is much more common. Saying "Pass my life" is not wrong, but it's unusual. If you say "Pass the time", then either sentence sounds fine in American English. – whiskeychief Feb 22 at 11:19
  • But which is grammartical? – Kumar sadhu Feb 22 at 11:20
  • @whiskeychief Are you sure that the use of the preposition "by" is correct? – RubioRic Feb 22 at 12:08
  • "By" in "Pass the time by doing something" is fine. link You can also leave it out without a problem. You can also "spend time" without by.. "I've spent many years building..." link. – whiskeychief Feb 24 at 0:58
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They are both correct and they both mean the same thing.

However, I would use "spending" or "living" instead of "passing".

In this context, "passing" actually makes me uncomfortable - I cannot explain why. Maybe another friend can help. Guess: similarity with "to pass away".

As @whiskeychief point out in the comments:

You can “pass the time”, “pass the hours” or “pass the summer”, but I don’t think you can “pass your life.” It’s not idiomatic.

  • You can “pass the time”, “pass the hours” or “pass the summer”, but I don’t think you can “pass your life.” It’s not idiomatic. – whiskeychief Feb 26 at 12:46

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