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I am making the photobook, there are sceneries and one sentence phrases on the pages.

I am not an English speaker, and in my language, there are no such things as articles whatsoever. This question, what is the correct way to write it in English?

I have written it one way first, but now I am totally confusing.

A day is increasing in January. it is not the specific day, it is a day in general. So does the cold, that comes at once. Would it be something specific, I would know, though there are such notions as cold, frost, day, time, I am completely lost with the correct articulation here.

Please help

Also, I appreciate if the correct word for cold is found. In the 1.sentence the speech is about the chill, and in the 3rd, about freeze (the worst cold, when the temperature falls far below zero C). I cannot use "cold" word in both places but am unsure about words chill and freeze in this context.

Unsure about 11. fieldwork. I mean the agricultural work in fields.

Eugene

  1. Cold comes unexpectedly (quickly). Frost covers everything and grows on trees.
  2. Snow covers the ground with a thick blanket.
  3. Cold comes rapidly, so does the darkest time.
  4. A day is increasing and the sun is shining.
  5. The low sun casts long shadows, but the coldest time is still to come.
  6. The coldest time comes suddenly.
  7. Winter is gradually leaving (declining).
  8. White snow is melting.
  9. The snow cover melted, revealing the bare ground.
  10. Green is in a hurry to take its place.
  11. Fieldwork has begun.
  12. Crops and vegetation grow rapidly.

I have added a new text completing the book

  1. Dandelions cover the ground with a yellow carpet.
  2. In the middle of Summer, you can read all night long.
  3. July is called "the month of hay" in Finnish.
  4. So, autumn has come and so the harvest time.
  5. “Golden Autumn” comes with its bright colors, rich yellow and red colors, clear azure sky.
  6. Harvest is taken in bins, and everything is ready for winter.

Explanations - 17. Golden autumn is really nice, but last year leaves have fallen while still green because of the frost. The season change in northern Europe happens very quickly and does not last more than a week or maximum two. It could be snow snow snow time till May, and then everything would melt in under a week when the Warm wind brings suddenly the very warm air from the South. This is why I have written "suddenly", "rapidly", every change in the season does happen within a couple of days. You go to the bed in "fallgold", and wake up in the winter season. One snow storm makes the scenery.

Winter and Spring do really rush and there are "white nights" and "dark time" in December, at least in the local language. It looks almost "evil" when the sun is very low, the sky is almost black and suddenly turns red.

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The rule is: "a" is an indefinite article, while "the" is a definite article. You use "a" when you're referring to any object of that type. You use "the" when you're referring to a specific object of that type.

Day is increasing in January. it is not the specific day, it is a day in general

Since you are not referring to a specific day, you would use the indefinite article: "A day".

So does the cold, that comes at once.

There is only one cold that is coming, so you would use the definite article: "The cold".


  1. Cold comes unexpectedly (quickly). Frost covers everything and grows on trees.

"The" is correct here, because when you say "cold", you are referring to the weather, and there's only one weather. The complete sentence, including implied words, is: "The cold [weather] comes unexpectedly [quickly]."

You are also correct to say that "Frost covers everything", but "and grows on trees" is very metaphorical. Frost doesn't actually grow, because it is not alive. So, although this is not grammatically wrong, if you wanted to avoid the metaphorical language, you would need to swap "grows" for "forms".

  1. Snow covers the ground with a thick blanket.

This is technically correct, but it would sound better to invert the order of the sentence so that it becomes: "A thick blanket of snow covers the ground."

  1. Cold comes rapidly, so does the darkest time.

This is understandable, but sounds weird, especially the second half of the sentence. It's difficult for me to rephrase when I only have limited context, but maybe try something like: "The cold comes rapidly, bringing shorter days."

"The darkest time" is not clear, and sounds more like a metaphor for evil than a literal reference to a shortening of the period of daylight during the winter.

  1. A day is increasing and the sun is shining.

It is not a single (albeit indefinite) day that is increasing here; it is the length of all days. So, perhaps try: "The days are getting longer, and the sun is shining." Or, invert the order: "The sun is shining, and the days are getting longer."

  1. The low sun casts long shadows, but the coldest time is still to come.

This is entirely correct.

  1. The coldest time comes suddenly.

This is also grammatically correct, but sounds a bit weird to me. The use of a superlative here ("coldest") is jarring. How can the weather suddenly be the coldest it is ever going to get? That's just not how weather patterns work.

Consider just saying: "Suddenly, it is cold.", or "Suddenly, the cold is upon us."

  1. Winter is gradually leaving (declining).

Correct as far as it goes, but it begs the question of what is coming next.

"Declining" doesn't work here at all (wrong connotation), but "leaving" is okay. "Fading" or "receding" would be better. This still begs the question of what is coming next. Perhaps consider, "Winter is gradually fading into spring."

  1. White snow is melting.

Technically correct, but the use of the adjective "white" here sounds odd—what other color of snow is there? (I mean, there are other colors of snow, but that's probably not the message you want to convey.) Keep it simple: "The snow is melting."

If you want to keep the word "white" in there, consider returning to your previous metaphor: "The white blanket of snow is melting."

  1. The snow cover melted, revealing the bare ground.

You should use present perfect tense here: "The snow cover has melted..."

I also think "barren" is more appropriate in this context, since the snow covering throughout winter has killed most of the vegetation: "...revealing the barren ground."

  1. Green is in a hurry to take its place.

Correct. Very metaphorical, but that is surely intentional.

If you wanted to use an article for "green", the definite article ("the") is appropriate. But it is not necessary here, and simpler to omit it.

  1. Fieldwork has begun.

"Fieldwork" sounds odd here. Try being more explicit: "The planting season has begun." Or, to keep consistent with your breathless pace: "The planting season is in full swing."

  1. Crops and vegetation grow rapidly.

Correct, but kind of loses the previous metaphorical feel. To keep the metaphor established on the previous pages, consider something like: "Fields of green quickly cover the once-barren soil."


More generally, I'm not sure why you're trying to rush everything. Why is everything happening "rapidly" or "quickly"? For a photo album, don't be afraid to slow the pace down and let the viewer take a breath, lingering on the page and enjoying the photos.

  • > 3. It's difficult for me to rephrase when I only have limited context, – Eugene Feb 24 at 15:02
  • The period of "above zero" temperature is very short in Northern Europe, and temperature falls far below zerro very quickly. Also there is "a darkest time" and there is a term for that in local language denoting the time, when sun rises only for an hour or so. It is glumy and dark time that is around the Christmas. Sky is covered with thick cloud cover and it is really dark. Already in January, one moth away, the situation has changed. Sky is clear and sun shines. Great time for photographer. > 8. – Eugene Feb 24 at 15:08
  • > 8. White snow. The "white snow" is a local metaphor. This way it is called. >Why is everything happening "rapidly" or "quickly"? It is interesting but in FInland, things in nature do really change quickly. It could be around +10 for a while in late Fall, then one day comes the snow, and it fals below zero and won't melt till late May. Also in the Sapring. Many years for now, it stayed minus till almost the May, even in the beginning of May, everything is cover by a meter thick snow cover. Then at once, comes the warm wind, temperature raises to +20 and all snow melts in a flash. – Eugene Feb 24 at 15:14
  • Vegetation will come out just in a few days, it won't delay or wait. After a week, all trees are covered green leaves. For the photographer, it is really a hurry, to capture this season change that happens in a week or maximum two. Then there is a summer until October, green sustain cold in fall, but when it comes to first frost, the leaves cannot stay any longer and will fall. Sometimes they fall being green. This is what I meant. Season change is quick. Winter very lenghtly. So does the green time, but change in rapid. – Eugene Feb 24 at 15:18
  • Rules ask to avoid thanking, however I wish to express the gratitude for a such complete answer. May I contact you of the forum for this text? – Eugene Feb 24 at 15:22

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