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Color one side of the plate in blue and the other side in red, and then draw a picture on the one side.

I would like to know whether the usage of "the one side" in the sentence above I created is correct, although it seems that using "front side/back side" instead of "one side/the other side" may be better.

  • It's an "unusual" construction - arguably a bit "awkward". Normally we wouldn't include a definite article in draw a picture on [the] one side, but in this specific context it's "necessary" in order to explicitly clarify that the writer intends you to draw the picture on the side that you coloured blue ("the one", not "the other" - you don't get to choose whichever you like, as would be the implication without that article). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 25 '19 at 15:11
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It makes sense, but make some minor corrections.

These are called commands in English. In commands, the subject "you" is omitted. Start the sentence with the verb just as you have done. Remember that commands are to be clear; specific, and state them in active voice.

Since there are only two sides to a plate, it's better to state the front side or back [bottom] side vs. one side or the other side. Don't be specific, if it doesn't matter, but expect questions when your command is not specific. Less specific = more questions.

Minor correction: Change the 2nd "on one side" to "the blue side."

Color one side of the plate in blue and the other side in red, and then draw a picture on the blue side.

More specific:

Color the front side of the plate in blue, and the back side in red, and then draw a picture on the front side of the plate.

Nice job! Cheers!

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