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I used ''amount of product'' in two same sentences . I wonder if thees sentences may have two diffrent meaning.

He demanded large amount of product. ( product in large quantity )

He demanded large amount of product . (big part of product )

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I think what you're trying to ask is whether you can use that same wording to mean both an absolute large quantity (such as tonnes of something) or a relative large quantity (a large share, such as 80%).

In both cases, you need an indefinite article (a) before 'large'. However, there is a difference in how you should word the rest of it depending on the meaning:

He demanded a large amount of product.

This means he demanded lots of the item, a large quantity in an absolute sense.

He demanded a large amount of the product.

This means he demanded a large share of some specific product or collection of product.


By the way, product isn't a mass noun in most everyday uses, and your phrasing makes it a mass noun. However, it is a mass noun when used to refer to haircare products - you can say "gosh, he uses a lot of product in his hair" to indicate that you think he uses a lot of hair mousse, spray, gel or whatever. So you appear to be suggesting that someone demanded a lot of haircare product.

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It depends what the "product" is. Is it something you can count, such as individual items? Or is it something you would measure, such as a liquid?

If you wanted to refer to a large quantity of a countable product you should really say:

He demanded a large number of bottles.

If you wanted to refer to a large quantity of a measurable product, you could say:

He demanded a large amount of water.

or

He demanded a large quantity of water.

The term "quantity" is to describe the aggregated number or total for any kind of product.

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