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Keep your face towards sunshine, and you’ll never have to see the shadow again.

Vs

Keep your face towards the sunshine, and you’ll never have to see the shadow again.

Is ‘the’ necessary in front of the word Sunshine? Because here we’re talking about sunshine in general not a specific sunshine

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    Your example simply doesn't strike me as something a native Anglophone would be likely to say. Sunshine (along with sunlight and daylight) are normally seen as "omnidirectional" (the light comes from the whole sky, not just the sun). You can only point or move towards them if you're currently in a dark enclosed space, and you can see chinks of light from somewhere leading to the open-air outside world. If you're already outside (as implied by casting a shadow), you might turn to face to sun, but you wouldn't face the sunshine. – FumbleFingers Feb 27 at 13:26
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    @FumbleFingers: In my experience, "towards" (or "to", or anything indicating direction) can create an idiosyncratic sense of "sunshine". "To have one's back to the sunshine" is a not uncommon synonym for "to have one's back to the sun". Of course, what's 'correct' according to any standard would potentially be different. "Sunshine" or "sunlight" usually means the light of the sun, and while one can be "in" it, "moving towards" it would usually mean not being in it and moving closer to it. – SamBC Feb 27 at 14:02
  • @SamBC: You say you're a native speaker, so I'm not sure I can really take issue with what you consider "natural". But I would just point out that Google Books has no written instances of his back to the sunshine, whereas it claims About 141,000 results for what I consider the natural version: his back to the sun. – FumbleFingers Feb 27 at 14:10
  • Thinking about it, I'm pretty sure what I'm talking about there may be mostly in spoken language, rather than written. There's a lot of little differences that crop up - and not consistently - in spoken English versus written. Though not as much of a difference as I'm told theree is between spoken Schweizerdeutsch and written German used in Switzerland. – SamBC Feb 27 at 14:28
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I think that you must use the

According to the Cambridge Dictionary

the

used to refer to things or people when only one exists at any one time

We have got only one sun shining in the sky.

sunshine

the light and heat that come from the sun

Butterflies fluttered about in the sunshine.
The house, with its fresh coat of paint, looked lovely in the sunshine.
In the village square, people were milling about in the sunshine.

But take into account what @FumbleFingers has mentioned:

Sunshine (along with sunlight and daylight) are normally seen as "omnidirectional" (the light comes from the whole sky, not just the sun)

and

Google Books has no written instances of his back to the sunshine, whereas it claims About 141,000 results for what I consider the natural version: his back to the sun

Maybe you should rephrase it using the sun instead of the sunshine.

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