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I stumbled upon this ELL question where the OP had a sentence

She is very envious that you have more money than she does.

Out of curiosity, I was wondering if I could rewrite it to any of these

She is very envious of you having more money. (1)
She is very envious of you having more money than her. (2)
She is very envious of you having more money than she does. (3)

She is very envious of you being wealthier. (4)
She is very envious of you being wealthier than her. (5)

I like options (1) and (4). However, I am not sure if I can omit the "than" part, which seems superfluous to me in this context. If I have to include "than", which of sentences (2), (3) would be more accurate?

Would any/all of those options be correct? Would it be an improvement whatsoever?

How would a native express that?

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    "She is very envious of you having more money THAT she does" is not correct. "THAN she does" Otherwise, all of those options are very correct. You can also leave out the "does" if you want to as it is implied. "more money than she." – Señor CMasMas Mar 1 at 23:08
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    All of your sentences look grammatically correct to me. You could even say just "She is very envious of your money" or "She is very envious of your wealth" - both of these sentences contain the implication that you are richer than her. – Mixolydian Mar 1 at 23:17
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@Mixolydian has already answered, but for the sake of clearing unanswered questions ...

All of your suggested alternatives are fine.

All the solutions are pretty much equally acceptable, and equally likely to be said by a native English speaker.

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