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I'm proofreading for an author and his sentence is, in essence, written like this:

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds and soon.

I think you need a comma before "and soon," but I can't find a reference for it anywhere.

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    Is this narration or dialogue, by the way? – Lambie Mar 4 at 21:06
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You say "in essence". Do you mean there's more after this sentence, as in...?

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds and soon will be thrown in jail (example, but you get the point)

In which case there should be a comma separating the two only if the two are complete sentences. Hence

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds and soon will be jailed.

and

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds, and soon he will be arrested.


If the sentence just ends where you put the period, then writing "and soon" is either a mistake, or the author means "..., and the above will happen to him soon". In which case, it should be:

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds, and soon.

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Sample sentence:

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds and soon.

The sentence is fine. That is an idiomatic usage usually associated with speech.

It is often used, for example, by parents:

"You better finish your homework and soon."

I don't know how to prove it other than sharing with you that it is common speech usage. It is very difficult to google for purposes of obtaining other examples.

Therefore, I just have to say: it is often tacked on at the end of an admonition or warning. That kind of thing.

Here is a slightly different usage but is also just tacked on:

George W. Bush, war message, Washington, DC, March 19, 2003: "I know that the families of our military are praying that all those who serve will return safely and soon."

Same idea. It refers to everything that comes earlier in the sentence being done or accomplished soon. It is a shortening of the idea: and this had better happen soon. No comma is used in this usage.

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It depends on the emphasis you want to place on the soon. The least emphasis would be to say:

Bob will soon be exposed for his bad deeds

or

Soon Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds

Greater emphasis would be:

Soon, Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds.

or

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds, and soon.

With greatest being:

Bob will be exposed for his bad deeds, and soon!

Adding the comma implies a pause for dramatic effect - especially if this is a line that someone is to be speaking.

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