0

Due to the nature of helicopter, external loads involving essential persons or equipment, diligent review and compliance with the manufacturer's balance data is required.

The bold part is confusing. Why is there no "and" between "helicopter" and "external"? Does it mean "due to the nature of (helicopter) and (external loads involving essential...)"?

  • 1
    Is the sentence quoted correctly? I can get some meaning, but it is at least very odd. "And" is the least of the problems, I think. – virolino Mar 4 at 12:16
  • @virolino Yes, it is correctly quoted. I think the sentence makes sense if it's "Due to the nature of helicopter, diligent review and compliance with the manufacturer's balance data is required for external loads involving essential persons or equipment". – jay Mar 4 at 12:41
  • 1
    I agree (mostly) with the meaning you get. But it does not make the original any more "chewable". First, I would use "due to the nature of the helicopter". Second, it may want to say: "due to the nature of the pair (helicopter, external loads...)" – virolino Mar 4 at 12:48
0

I think that a change of words may clarify this. Be careful, however, that the meaning can actually be wrong - the original is not "state-of-the-art".

Due to the nature of the helicopter and of the external loads involving essential persons or equipment, diligent review and compliance with the manufacturer's balance data is required.

Even though it adds some understanding, I am still not satisfied with the result.

If this is what the authors wanted to say, then you were right to add and - with the note that some other words were needed.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.