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I know the sentence is overly long, but I saw authors do that too, but the question is not if this is bad style, the question is whether it's ok to nest the question in the middle of the sentence and still finish the question with an interrogation mark.

I saw her and I thought she would be the one, that being said, do you think she could be of any use if she doesn't happen to be the chosen one, because I think she could compromise us by revealing who we are?

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You can do this by using punctuation to introduce a parenthetical or else just making an unexpected break in the sentence (look up anacoluthon), like so:

I saw her and I thought she would be the one—that being said, do you think she could be of any use if she doesn't happen to be the chosen one?—because I think she could compromise us by revealing who we are.

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The quotation you gave is a little awkward because you lose sense of the meaning of everything by the time you get to the end. (Also, the first comma is technically ungrammatical.) The question mark seems out of place because it doesn't sound like a question is being asked in the end.

I would actually break it up into three different sentences:

I saw her and I thought she would be the one. That being said, do you think she could be of any use if she doesn't happen to be the chosen one? Because I think she could compromise us by revealing who we are.

A person's dialogue can sometimes continue with a short clarifying sentence after they have asked a question—as here. The person answering would have no problem understanding both the question and the clarification.

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