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I wonder which form(s) are correct amongst the following:

  1. we work on a research problem at the intersection between biology and computer science.
  2. we work on a research problem at the intersection of biology and computer science.
  3. we work on a research problem in the intersection between biology and computer science.
  4. we work on a research problem in the intersection of biology and computer science.
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  • Could one of the close voter explains why they think this question is "too broad"? Mar 5 '19 at 20:09
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Number 2 is correct:

  1. we work on a research problem at the intersection of biology and computer science.

According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, "intersection" is appropriate if we consider the following definitions:

intersection

  • a place or area where two or more things (such as streets) intersect;
  • the set of elements common to two or more sets; especially: the set of points common to two geometric configurations;

In the context of the question, the problem is about biology as well as about computer science.

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  • can intersection be used this way? Mar 5 '19 at 12:52
  • I added info in the answer.
    – virolino
    Mar 5 '19 at 13:02
  • It'd to be great if the downvoter could explain their vote. Mar 5 '19 at 20:10
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    Unfortunately, there are also not so nice netizens around, and they down-vote as a sport. I suspect (without proof) that some of them feel threatened and "fight" against others for reputation. Ignore them, the way I do.
    – virolino
    Mar 6 '19 at 5:29
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Given its set theory use, you can be in an intersection as well as at it. Either works, though whether it will seem odd to someone depends on their background. Similarly, intersections can be of or between two things, and I suspect that which is preferred depends on dialect and possibly context (such as academic subject).

This is gut feel more than anything else, but I would go for at and of, if your intention is to produce minimal surprise in a general audience.

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