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I think it's idiomatic, but the expression "on a price for quality basis" is quite a tongue-twister, so is there an alternative expression that has less syllabes, so you can say it more quickly?

On a price for quality basis, Huawei phones are better than Apple phones.

It doesn't have to exactly mean the same thing, but it should be as precise as possible. Being too general would be a bad thing in my opinion.

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    Bang for your buck? – Smock Mar 6 at 16:49
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I'd rephrase the sentence as

Huawei phones offer more value for money than Apple phones.

(of course, being an Ask Different moderator, I have to disagree ...)

or, @Smock's more informal suggestion:

Huawei phones give more bang for your buck than Apple phones.

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An alternative is to say:

In terms of getting what you pay for, Huawei phones are better than Apple phones.

This follows the idiom you get what you pay for:

[Merriam-Webster]

—used to say that a thing that can be bought for a very low price probably isn't very good
// "That cheap camera I bought is broken already." "Well, you get what you pay for."

It's used to mean the opposite too—that it's often the case that if you want quality, you have to pay more for it.


Of course in this case, you want to express a slightly additional meaning. If you pay X and get X with Apple phones, but you pay X and get X+Y with Huawei phones, then you're actually getting more than what you paid for.

If you wanted to emphasize that aspect, you'd say:

In terms of getting more than what you pay for, Huawei phones are better than Apple phones.

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