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Very confusing. Why did the writer use the word than here? We usually say more than. I do not have problem with it. That is comparative. But my two concerns:

  1. Is this comparative in this case? If the answer is yes, then why on earth the writer has put the " application received" between " more" and "than"?
  2. Does the word revise in this text just refer to study again or is about study and changing?

Claims for the week ended March 15 were revised to show 1,000 more applications received than previously reported. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast first-time applications for jobless benefits rising to 325,000 in the week ended March 22. ................ Taken from Reuters

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Some words have been left out here.

Claims for the week ended [ending] March 15 were revised to show that 1,000 more applications were received than were previously reported.

You will often find words such as "that" and "were" left out in newspaper stories to save space. Words cost money to send over the wire, and they cost money to print.

Now, to go over your questions:

  1. Alicja's answer needs no further explanation.
  2. The claims (in a newer report, presumably) were revised because new information revealed that 1000 more applications were submitted than a previous report said there were. Revised refers to claims, in this case claims for unemployment benefits. "Claims for the week" is really "the number of claims submitted for the week." Again, words are being left out because context is assumed to be understood.
  • Thank you. What about "to show"? It sounds like saying " in order to show" , doesn't it? Perhaps different from what you mentioned. You said it means "showed" . Many thanks in advance. – user5036 Mar 27 '14 at 14:01
  • Revised in order to show and revised to show are pretty much saying the same thing. The first is wordy. I've revised my explanation because it wasn't quite accurate (sorry). Perhaps you'll have another look. – BobRodes Mar 27 '14 at 14:08
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  1. Yes, it is comparative. Basically, both versions would be correct. Let's look at a simpler sentence:

    I ate 5 cookies more than you.
    I ate 5 more cookies than you.
    
  2. "revise" here is used in the sense of update, recalculate, alter (something) in the light of further evidence

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This answer came a little "late in the game" (but provides some good additional information).


Original Sentence. Note that phrases that will be revised for clarity are marked [with bold and brackets]:

Claims for [the week ended March 15] were revised [to] [show]
1,000 more applications [received] than [previously reported].

Economists [polled] by Reuters [had forecast] [Ø]1
first-time applications for jobless benefits
[rising to] 325,000 [in the week ended March 22]

Transformation #1. Revised for clarity.

Claims for [the week that ends on March 15th] were revised [in order to] [show that]
1,000 more applications [were received] than [were previously reported].

Economists [that were polled] by Reuters [had previously forecasted2] [that the number of] first-time applications for jobless benefits
[would rise to] 325,000 [for the week that ends on March 22nd].

Transformation #2. Swap sentence order to reflect natural time, so Event 1 comes before Event 2.

Economists [that were polled] by Reuters [had previously forecasted] [that the number of] first-time applications for jobless benefits
[would rise to] 325,000 [for the week that ends on March 22nd].

Claims for [the week that ends on March 15th] were revised [in order to] [show that]
1,000 more applications [were received] than [were previously reported].

Transformation #3. Add some semantic information to clarify.

Economists that were polled by Reuters had previously forecasted that the number of first-time applications for jobless benefits
would rise to 325,000 for the week that ends on March 22nd.

However, claims for the week that ends on March 15th were revised in order to show that 1,000 more applications were received than were previously reported. So one might expect the new number for the week ending March 22 to be 326,000.


1. The empty-set notation "Ø" is used here as a placeholder. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_(linguistics)
2. Educational, prescriptive conjugation for both the past tense and the past participle of "forecast" is simply "forecast". This usage is highly used in newspapers. However, "forecasted" is also used, especially in academic and scientific fields. See http://grammarist.com/usage/forecast-forecasted

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