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quick question.

Which phrase sounds better?

Can you please provide me the pin code associated to your account at T-Mobile?

or

Can you please provide me the pin code associated to your account with T-Mobile?

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Can you please provide me the pin code associated to your account with/at T-Mobile?

An account may be with Z or at Z, but most people would simply say "your T-Mobile account".

However, your sentence is unidiomatic in other ways

  1. We speak of X being associated with Y, not to.
  2. Moreover, associated with your account is clunky; you would do better to use for your T-Mobile account.
  3. There's really no need to mention either the account or the code—in any but the most formal registers these will be implicit.
  4. Could is a shade less demanding than can in these contexts, and therefore "politer".

A much shorter way of phrasing this request would be

Could you please provide me your T-Mobile PIN?

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  • I agree with this answer - the question is better if phrased in this concise way.
    – Mixolydian
    Mar 7 '19 at 15:54
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I would say

Can you please provide me the pin code linked to your account with T-Mobile?

Or possibly:

Can you please provide me the pin code associated with your account at T-Mobile?

Either with or at works, though I think with sounds better. One normally says they have an account with a provider. associated to sounds weird to me, though other people may disagree- I have heard this phrase used before, but I find it jarring. associated with is a more common phrase, so I think this sounds more natural. But using “with” twice in one sentence would probably not sound good. So I would prefer the phrase linked to when talking about the pin.

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