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I'm really confused about which term I should use in order to say that someone received money from his job after suffering an injury at work.

He was compensated by his job?

He indemnified by his job?

He received reparations from his job?

  • These terms are nearly synonymous in the context of countries paying tribute to other countries as part of a settlement to end a war. But in other contexts, they have very different meanings. – Jasper Mar 8 '19 at 1:33
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fred2 is correct.

He was compensated by his employer for his injury.

says he was given money or other consideration(s) for the injury.

But rather than just saying the other words are odd, I'll explain how they're odd.

He was indemnified by his employer for his injury.

says his employer either compensated him for the injury, or promised legal protection against any claims of legal wrongdoing relating to the injury. It's my impression that the connotation is pretty strongly towards the second version. But most of my interaction with this word is in legal agreements, so it's possible that the fact I read those things colors my impression of its general meaning.

He received reparations from his employer for his injury.

says he was given money or other consideration(s) for the injury because they admitted to wrongdoing. Employers tend to be very reluctant to admitting any wrongdoing, so this is almost certainly not the answer.

Just to be clear, I'm not a lawyer. But I read more legal stuff than most computer programmers, and asking about indemnifying and giving reparations apparently brings out a certain amount of my legalese.

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3

The usual word used when talking about a monetary award from an employer is 'compensation'. So the best answer might be:

His employer paid him compensation / He received compensation from his employer.

But

He was compensated by his employer.

also works.

Note, I have changed 'job' to 'employer'. A job is not a thing which can do something. It is the employer who does things; namely pays wages, compensation, etc.

The other words aren't necessarily wrong, but they might sound a bit unusual.

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