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1.) I have to prove myself that I'm a good leader. 2.) I have to prove to myself that I'm a good leader.

closed as off-topic by Nathan Tuggy, Hellion, Jason Bassford Supports Monica, RubioRic, ColleenV Mar 12 at 18:09

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Both are correct. But each one has its own indication.

I have to prove myself that I'm a good leader.

Using "myself" here is for emphasizing the fact that you are a good leader and feel the need to prove that to others.

  • "Myself" can be omitted safely without changing the meaning of the sentence.

I have to prove to myself that I'm a good leader.

The addition of "to" shifts the need to prove that fact to yourself instead of to other people.

  • Omitting "to myself" changes the sentence to be directed toward others.
  • If my answer is not sufficient or provides wrong information, then pointing that out would be more helpful than leaving a downvote for mysterious reasons. – Tasneem ZH Mar 10 at 3:03

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