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So what is a natural way to express it? I mean, my mom says:

"You shouldn't sleep with your sweater on. Or it'll get lint balls(or fuzzballs).

So it the use of "get" natural? I not what can be a natural alternative to be used in this context?

And what about:

I will tell you how to remove/take off lint balls.

Is the use of "take off" instead of "remove" natural?

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Both to get and to remove work nicely with lint balls.

To remove the lint balls, use a fabric shaver.

You don't have to dye it and walk around with nasty lint balls in your locs, simply remove it.

Graze the material with the razor to remove the lint balls.

After awhile they get these lint balls on them.

My clothes are not getting those lint balls on them.

They also get those little lint balls after too many washes.

I am not sure about to take off, but to get off seems to be commonly used.

You could also use get rid of.

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Small balls of fibers that form on some, usually knit fabrics are also called pills. 'Pill' is also a verb for the formation of such balls, and the verb for removing them is "depill" (also de-pill).

So, you may know how to depill/de-pill a sweater/to get pills off a sweater, or to remove pilling/lint balls/sweater pills. As for the sweater you don't take off lying on the sofa, it'll pill in no time.

  • And can I use: Do you know how to "take off" these lint balls? Is the use of "take off" natural instead of "remove"? – It's about English Mar 11 at 14:45
  • @It'saboutEnglish -Personally to me, take off is associated with a flat surface--planes take off and land, or the clothes I take off. See here – VictorB Mar 11 at 15:40

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