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A basic sentence:

They make things look better than they are.

So far, it seems ok. But now I would like to be more specific:

They make things look better on TV or on posters than they are.

And it looks awkward for me and I guess it is wrong. Is it? If so, how can I convey information from the first sentence alongside details about TV and posters?

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It would sound better if you made "TV and posters" the subject instead of the ambiguous "they":

TV and posters make things look better than they are.

or as @JasonBassford comments, to be more specific about who on TV and the posters makes things look better,

People in ads on TV and posters make things look better than they are.

  • But let's assume that we talk about people or ads, not TV/posters itself, therefore there is "they". – ziolek Mar 11 at 18:26
  • @ziolek People on TV and ads on posters make things look better than they are. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Mar 11 at 18:32
  • I like @JasonBassford's answer. – Mixolydian Mar 11 at 18:41
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    @Mixolydian Feel free to add it to your answer. I was just providing commentary. :) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Mar 11 at 18:42

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