2

In my daily report, I would say

I have finished my last work task and waiting for a new one.

But I think "wait" is not positive. Is there any alternative for here?

  • 2
    You could say "I'm looking forward to starting a new one."; "I'm ready to tackle a new one."; or even "I'm eager to begin my next task." – Lorel C. Mar 14 at 0:59
3

Wait is neutral (the phrasal variation wait on might not be).

The word you are looking for is probably ready - this means not only are you waiting but actively want (or are prepared for) a new task.

1

Aside from an alternative word for waiting (and ready as already suggested is good), your sentence has an issue with its parallelism and elision.

When we remove words in the latter part of a sentence, we assume that if we were to add them back in again, we'd be adding in the same words:

I like to dance, [to] sing, and [to] play cribbage.
→ I like to dance, sing, and play cribbage.

Here, there is no need to repeat to the second and third time, because we assume the first use of it applies to the all of the verbs, not just the first one.

But this wouldn't be right, as shown by expanding it to show the missing verb forms:

I like to dance, sing, and playing cribbage.
→ ✘ I like to dance, to sing, and to playing cribbage.

In order to make that sentence completely natural, it needs to be rephrased more significantly:

✔ I like to dance and sing, and I like playing cribbage.

This changes it from a single clause with an unnaturally mixed verbal structure, into two clauses, each with a similar verbal structure. (And notice how there is a comma before the conjunction that joins the second clause.)


This is your sentence:

I have finished my last work task and waiting for a new one.
→ ✘ I have finished my last work task and I have waiting for a new one.

It should be similarly rephrased to have two clauses:

I have finished my last work task, and I am waiting for a new one.


If you take your original sentence and just substitute ready it will have the same problem and require the same correction:

✘ I have finished my last work task and ready for a new one.
✔ I have finished my last work task, and I am ready for a new one.

Note that most people will make the mental correction upon reading the original version, adding in the correct form of the missing verb. However, it it makes it sound better (because no mental correction is required), if you write it out explicitly.

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