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He led the team to win the competition without support from the instructors.

Infinitive clause tells purpose most of the time ,
but can infinitival clauses sometimes tell the result?

Like the example sentence above, the infinitive doesn't seem to tell the purpose,
so does it explain the result?

Or neither options are wrong for this sentence and the infinitive clause provides a different meaning?

  • It's neither. Result adjuncts are expressed by either a PP with so as head and a content clause as complement, or by a PP with with as head and an NP complement with the form _the result + content clause. Your example is a catenative construction. "Lead" is a catenative verb and the infinitival "to win the competition without support from the instructors" is its catenative complement. – BillJ Mar 15 '19 at 13:28
  • @BillJ Thanks, so the understood subject of the infinitval is "The team" , is that right? – Fionna Mar 15 '19 at 13:38
  • I believe so, yes. – BillJ Mar 15 '19 at 13:44
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He led the team [to win the competition without support from the instructors].

No, it is not a result adjunct, but a catenative complement clause.

Result adjuncts are expressed by either a PP with so as head and a content clause as complement, or by a PP with with as head and an NP complement with the form the result + content clause: They had spent all their money, [so / with the result that didn't even have the fare to get home].

"Lead" is a catenative verb, and this is a complex catenative construction where the infinitival is its catenative complement.

The intervening NP "the team" is the syntactic subject of the matrix clause, and the semantic (understood) subject of the subordinate one. It's an ordinary object, not a raised one.

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