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What word can I use to call someone who thinks he can fool everybody because he thinks they are not so clever as he is?. In my research I got these:

  1. Adjectives - condescending, patronizing, snooty, egotistic, snobby, pompous, arrogant, conceited, sneering and supercilious.
  2. Nouns - smart-arse, douche-bag.

I am looking for a word or expression preferably in noun form like 2 above but warned of being for informal situations. I wanted to use the word to warn someone whose behaviour I disapprove of trying to fool me as he thinks he does on others. Like I want to warn him by saying to his face "you patronizer you can fool others but not me". Does the word patronizer sounds ok here without sounding unsual?. If not, can someone suggest better expression?

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May not be exactly what you are looking for, but Sneering and Superciliousness come to my mind.

Sneering

Superciliousness

  • I kind of felt like these are more reaction-describing, but the OP has more focus on reasoning, which makes it a little different than what he may be looking for – Isa Mar 18 at 14:15
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Your definition has itself negative connotations. These words below are generally slang and not formal language, and should be used with great care to prevent yourself from becoming the subject of your description. Good luck.

  1. Smartass.
  2. Douche bag.
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    The first of these suggestions is somewhat applicable, although it's not a perfect fit. The second is much too general, describing only a person that behaves nastily in some fashion. – Nathan Tuggy Mar 16 at 7:20
  • These are only slang. – Lambie Mar 16 at 22:30
  • Yes, they are slang, and I said so right from the beginning. During formal situations, one generally do not say things like what the OP is describing. More common is to use inferred meaning to achieve saying that someone is being a smartass/douche. E.g. "I prefer showing the results of my work speak for themselves rather than making others feel unwelcomed. But I understand not everyone approach other people the same way." <-- Like, I am really just saying "what a smartass" here, but without really saying it. That is what I meant by inferred meaning. – Isa Mar 18 at 14:21

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