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I came across this sentence:

The term "pit bull" does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms "German shepherd" and "poodle".

I simply translated "as do" into "like", which makes the sentence like this:

"German shepherd" and "poodle" are like "pit bull". They all do not designate a breed of dog.

But later I discovered the correct meaning of the sentence should be this:

The "pit bull" does not designate a breed of dog. But "German shepherd" and "poodle" do designate a breed of dog.

I'm so confused right now. Doesn't "as do" mean "like"?

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Turning "as do" into "like" may not be quite right (it should really be "like … do"), but that's not where you went astray.

Instead, the correct replacement sentence would look like this:

The term "pit bull" does not designate a breed of dog, like the terms "German shepherd" and "poodle" do.

The important part is that you're matching "as" or "like" to the wrong part of the sentence. It does not state that "pit bull" is "like" or "as" anything. What it links to is "designate a breed of dog". That is, the sentence looks like this:

The term "pit bull" does not [do something].

And "do something" is

designate a breed of dog, as do the terms "German shepherd" and "poodle".

A clearer expression might swap out both "as" and "like":

The term "pit bull" does not designate a breed of dog in the way that the terms "German shepherd" and "poodle" do.

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  • Thanks a lot! I understand my mistake now. But is there any way to prevent it from happening again? Are there any tips regarding matching the "as" to the correct part of the sentence? Or I just need to be more cautious dealing with a sentence with an "as"? – eh090 Mar 18 '19 at 7:27

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