1

And except for those at the tippy top, shareholder value isn’t a meaningful goal that excites and engages them.

I searched online dictionaries but I didn't find a good definition for"tippy top" especially one relates to the Text above.

So could you please explain it to me?

The fuller text:

A sense of purpose. People want to feel as if their work matters, that their contributions help achieve something really important. And except for those at the tippy top, shareholder value isn’t a meaningful goal that excites and engages them. They want to know that they— and their organizations—are doing something big that matters to other people.

https://hbr.org/2014/11/being-happy-at-work-matters

1

It's a playful expression for "very top", or "top most", right at the top with nothing/no-one else further up. Also occurs as tip-top.

So, this is saying that shareholder value isn't a meaningful goal for people at a company, except those at the very top of the company, directors and presidents and vice presidents etc.

2

tippy top is at the very top.

It is slightly childish language.

Those at the tippy top [of the economic spectrum]: the very richest people.

the Y sounds like IE: they are both pronounced the same way and sound kid-like or like something you would say to a child]:

diminuitives in English

  1. -ie: Words with this suffix are from English (as in doggie), Scottish (for example, laddie), or Dutch (such as cookie), or are diminutives of personal names, as in Charlie. [or cutie, mine]

  2. -y: This form, with doubling of the preceding letter, is seen both in diminutives of given names, such as Bobby and Patty, and in words like puppy and mommy. [or tippy, as in the OP's example: tippy top]

  • Lambie: +1 "It is slightly childish language." ... and mainly American. – Michael Harvey Mar 17 at 9:09

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