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I looked the expression up in a number of dictionary to no avail. What does 'it' refer to?

Any game that involves more than one person involves socializing, whether it’s cooperating during a scavenger hunt or competing to see who can get the most balls in a basket. Playing games with kids teaches team work, the consequences of cheating, and how to be good sports whether they win or lose. It’s not hard to see how those skills make it into the daily lives of kids in the classroom, on play dates, and later in life in the workplace. But like all things we hope to teach our children, learning to cooperate or to compete without being a jerk takes practice. Humans aren’t naturally good at losing, so there will be tears, yelling, and cheating, and maybe somebody will even knock over the board, scattering pieces under the couch when she loses a game, but that’s okay. The point is, playing games with kids allows them a safe place to practice getting along, following rules, and learning how to be graceful in defeat. So when your kids deserve a technical foul for the fits they’re pitching over a game, call it quits for then, but definitely come back to more games later. If you do that enough you’ll start to see more mature players coming to the table.

https://heatherswainbooks.com/play-these-games-introduction/

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    A similar use: "The song made it into the charts." – Weather Vane Mar 16 at 20:18
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In the sentence:

It’s not hard to see how those skills make it into the daily lives of kids in the classroom, on play dates, and later in life in the workplace.

"make it" refer to the fact that those skills (team work, consequences of cheating, fair play etc..) are directly used in the daily lives of the kids.

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Merriam Webster:

c : to gain a place on or in
make the team the story made the papers [could also be said: made it into the papers]

This is similar: to gain a place in the lives of children.

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