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If a device is disabled from an account, then the information about that device will become unavailable to the member unless the device is enabled in the member’s account, which requires the member’s email and password.

Does "which" refer to "the member's account" or "enabling in the member account"?

I read this post: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/comma-before-which/ and it seems that the "which" refers to the member's account but want to be sure.

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The process of enabling the device again in members account requires the member's email and password, and Which is used for this process.

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You can interpret the statement in this way by reconstructing it.

If a device is disabled from an account, then the information about that device will become unavailable to the member, unless the device is enabled in the member’s account which requires the member’s email and password.

It's not grammatically clean, but it's linking the related clauses. By this you can understand that the email and password are required for enabling the device. This isn't an entirely practical solution for all solutions since it's not always easy to reconstruct a sentence, but when all else fails, rely on your common sense to guide you.

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If a device is disabled from an account, then the information about that device will become unavailable to the member unless the device is enabled in the member’s account, which requires the member’s email and password.

I would be inclined to say that "which" refers to "the device is enabled in the member’s account".

We understand that enabling the device in the member's account requires the member's email and password.

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'Which' is an adverbial relative pronoun -- it refers to what comes right before it, but that could be either a noun phrase (the account) or an entire predicate (the enabling). You can't tell just from the grammar -- you need knowledge and context. In this case it is the enabling.

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