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I want to know exact meaning because I am writing stories but I have some doubts regarding usage. I know.

"he ran from home" means left home and started running.

and

" he ran a mile " means he completed running a mile.

also

"he ran up to the school" means he ran until he reach the school/a park.

but what does

"he ran from home to the school/a park"

mean? Does it mean he started running from home toward the school or does it mean he reached the school by running.

and what does

"he ran to the school/a park "

mean. Does it mean he ran towards the school or does it mean he reached the school by running.

Please explain different usages and its meanings of the verb ran (in the question i am talking about the verb. not difference between school or the school .in the above examples. i have used the school to indicate the destination like a park. a forest etc.)

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    Does it mean he started running from home toward the school? Yes. Or does it mean he reached the school by running? Yes. It means both of those things. It covers the entire time period, from home to school. I'm not sure why you think they would be mutually exclusive. – Jason Bassford Mar 18 at 7:09
  • i thought like that because in the sentence "he talked about cars" means he has completed talking about cars and in "he started talking about cars" means he has begun talking about cars but not yet finished. right . and in "he ran from home" means he left home but we don't know where he ran .so i thought "he ran from home to a park" means he ran from home and towards a park .and so i got confused because it also means he ran all along the way from home to a park.. so i was thinking had he reached it or on the way to it . but now I have understood .thank you – santosh vvns Mar 19 at 14:22
  • There can be some ambiguity in saying he ran from home to a park. Normally, we interpret it as meaning that he got all the way there. If that's not intended, then you would say he started running from home to a park or he ran from home toward a park. – Jason Bassford Mar 19 at 14:27
  • above sentences also have some ambiguity because.he started running from home to a park can also mean he started a habit of running out of home and the other sentence he ran from home toward a park mean he ran in the direction of a park we would not know if he wanted to run to it or it just happened to be in that direction ...so think I have to provived some context to remove the ambiguity in the above three sentence if I want to be precise in writing – santosh vvns Mar 19 at 17:35
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The prepositional phrase "to school" gives a destination. So "He ran to school." or "He ran to the school" implies he ran all the way from his starting point to school.

If you just want to indicate direction you would say "He ran towards school."

"He ran up to the school" is less clear. It might mean he ran the last part of the journey (perhaps he started on the bus, or walking).

Jon was running late and he knew his teachers would be angry if he wasn't on time, so he ran to school and was panting as he entered the classroom

Joe saw smoke rising from the school gym and though of Mary; she must still be in the building! He began to run towards the school, but an explosion knocked him off his feet and he blacked out.

Jeff got of the bus and started walking towards the school. He saw Daphne was already waiting for him and so he ran up to the school gate.

  • i am not concerned about the institution . i am talking about the place the school or a park etc. for example he went to a park and met a friend means .first he reached and then there he met a friend . and. he started going to a park and met a friend. means he left for park and met a friend on the way so i want to know the sequence of action. when i write . he ran from home to a park and met a friend. does it mean he ran from home towards a park in doing so he met friend or does it mean he met his friend after reaching the park – santosh vvns Mar 18 at 7:02
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    @santoshvvns I am not concerned about the institution. But you asked about that specifically in the latter part of your question. You wanted to know the difference between to school and to the school. That is the difference. Unless you had meant to include the definite article in the title of your question? You might consider editing your question to use list items, with item a clearly different structure that you're asking about. – Jason Bassford Mar 18 at 7:14
  • thank you for the suggestion i have edited it for more clarity – santosh vvns Mar 18 at 7:31
  • I've edited my answer to remove the details about the use of "the". This information can be found elsewhere. – James K Mar 18 at 17:49

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