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And the classy Oxford feeling of nothing mattering except books and poetry and Greek statues, and [nothing worth mentioning having happened since the Goths sacked Rome.] (Coming up for air)

The placement of the participle phrase confuses me, why is the participle phrase placed behind worth mentioning instead of being right behind the noun nothing?

Nothing having happened since the Goths sacked Rome worth mentioning.

If the sentence above is correct, can the sentence be understood as :

Nothing which had happened since the Goths sacked Rome worth mentioning.

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You can place the phrase after mentioning or after nothing, they are entirely equivalent. They parse differently, but the end effect is the same. It is a matter of style or personal preference.

You are correct in your understanding, though you missed a word out of it:

Nothing which had happened since the Goths sacked Rome was worth mentioning.

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The phrase "nothing worth mentioning" is an idiom, and will normally be kept together.

Did anything happen? / Nothing worth mentioning.

In the sentence from mthe question this phrase can be broken apart with little change in meaning, although a certian emphasis is lost, but such a form would be less likely.

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