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The present perfect is used for quantity = how much, how many:

I have done 100 push-ups.

The present perfect continuous is used to express how long something has been happening:

I have been doing push-ups daily for two years.

If I want to combine the two, can I say:

I have been doing 100 push-ups daily for two years?

  • Note that if you simply combine them, the meaning could change. In your first sentence you only say you've done 100 push-ups. You don't say that you done that many daily. If you've done a total of 100 in your life, and not that many daily, then your combined sentence is wrong. – Jason Bassford Mar 18 at 18:19
  • @Jason Bassford Is it possible to say: "I have done 100 push-ups daily for two years"? – anouk Mar 18 at 20:13
  • Yes, that is grammatical. – Jason Bassford Mar 18 at 21:50
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Yes

I have been doing 100 push-ups daily for two years.

is valid English.

One could also use the simple past:

I did 100 push-ups every day for the last two years

I did 100 push-ups.

The simple past can also be used for duration

He spoke for two hours.

She lived for 95 years.

He endured two weeks of torture

She enjoyed a month at the beach.

They took a two-week honeymoon

  • you can't use the simple past if something has been continuing up to the present. Simple past is for past events. My example has been ongoing from two years ago up to the present. – anouk Mar 18 at 17:42
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    @anouk Yes "I did 100 push-ups every day for the last two years" implies that the speaker has now stopped, but "I did 100 push-ups every day for the last two years, and I still do them" is valid – David Siegel Mar 18 at 18:07

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