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I asked a question:

I and we think, Why should India not be able to make such a huge expenditure for a region, which is urgently needed?

Is the sentence grammatically correct? Does the question mark make difference in meaning?

The poor region is full of criminals and under international sanctions.I and we think why should India be able after persuading international community?. If India succeeds,I and we think "Why should India not be able to..." The "word"should" used with I and We to express a polite request,opinion or hope.[source-Compact Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus].
[1]I and we think why India should be able to make such huge expenditure[2]I and we think why India should not be able to make such a huge expenditure.Sentences[1] and[2] are also grammatically correct,but meanings are different.

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No, you can’t just put a question mark at the end of a statement to turn it into a question, if this is what you’re asking. Usually you have to change the word order as well.

Why should India not be able to make such a huge expenditure for a region, which it urgently needed?

I don’t think the rest of the sentence’s grammar is totally right, but you definitely need to reverse the words India and should at the beginning if it’s a question.

  • @Mixolydian-The question begins with 'why' so there is a question mark at the end.use of the word 'should' and 'should not' may bear same meaning.but I intended double meaning though.. – user26375 Mar 19 at 7:41
  • @Mixolydian-urgently needs or urgently needed is a choice between active and passive voice.in news paper reports we often find such sentences. – user26375 Mar 19 at 8:45
  • @user26375 What “double meaning” did you intend? should and should not mean opposite things. The way you phrase a question in response to a statement like “X should not do Y” is “Why should X not do Y?” I see you fixed the tense agreement issue in “which it needed” that Hunter brought up by changing it to is, so this word order at the beginning of the question is now the only thing that needs to change. – Mixolydian Mar 19 at 11:08
  • @Mixolydian-the question 'why India should not be able to make such a huge expenditure for the region,which is urgently needed? the sentence[question] is asked to the listener not to the site [expressing doubt] may be able or may not be able.a doubt is hidden in the question. If I ask 'why India should be able,that completely changes purpose of the question. Is my question grammatically incorrect? This is an interrogative question.The question begins with ‘why'. – user26375 Mar 19 at 13:35
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    @user26375 It’s ok that you’re posting here because you think you sent an incorrect question to a bank; the reason for posting doesn’t matter. But I hope you see the difference in the word order that I’ve been trying to show you. All you need to do is switch the words “should” and “India” in order to have a grammatical question. – Mixolydian Mar 19 at 14:47
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Tense agreement problem on "should be" (present) and "needed" (past).

Why should India not be able to make such a huge expenditure for a region, which it urgently needs?

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Why should India not be able to make such a huge expenditure for a region, which is urgently needed?

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