1

Could you say if I'm correct translating the following sentence:

And I'd like to see about getting Harry some contacts.

like

And I'd like to see about providing Harry with some contacts.

I'm asking this because I couldn't find any hmm... evidence of existence such a language construction (to get {somebody} {something}), and not sure about the accuracy of the interpretation.

5
  • Can you give us more context? What contacts are we talking about?
    – Kaique
    Mar 19, 2019 at 21:09
  • @Kyle, Basically it's about getting business contacts.
    – Alexander
    Mar 19, 2019 at 21:11
  • I would've said "I'd like to get Harry the phone number for so and so", instead of forming the phrase like that.
    – Kaique
    Mar 19, 2019 at 21:14
  • Both are correct just the phrase structure that needs to change.
    – Kaique
    Mar 19, 2019 at 21:15
  • Maybe "I'd like to see if could get Harry..." Would sound better.
    – Kaique
    Mar 19, 2019 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

3

"To get somebody something" is to acquire something for somebody. If it's a physical object, it means you acquire it and give it to them. If it's not a physical object, then the precise meaning will depend on exactly what it is.

Examples:

"I'm just going to the shop, do you want anything?"
"Yeah, could you get me some Doritos?"

"Hey, Harry, I haven't seen you in a while. What brings you here?"
"Well, I was trying to my daughter a work experience placement. Any chance you could help out?"

This is, essentially, another way of saying "get something for somebody".

0

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .