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A woman had bitten off part of her tongue owing to the jump the explosion gave her.

Can a relative pronoun which or that be understood to be between jump and the explosion?

A woman had bitten off part of her tongue owing to the jump which/that the explosion gave her.

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She hadn't showed that little bit of imagination I'd credited her with.

Can a relative pronoun which or that be understood to be between imagination and I'd?

She hadn't showed that little bit of imagination which/that I'd credited her with.

With or without the relative pronoun ,does it differ in meaning?

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    This isn't your question, but the first sentence is very unnatural - in English we wouldn't usually talk about an explosion "giving someone a jump." Either the explosion is "giving someone a scare" or she is "jumping at the explosion." Mar 20 '19 at 16:34
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The relative pronoun is generally omitted when it would be in the accusative case.

Men must reap the things(which/that) they sow.

A woman had bitten off part of her tongue owing to the jump the explosion gave her.
A woman had bitten off part of her tongue owing to the jump(which/that) the explosion gave her.

Do not differ in meaning.

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  • Thanks, what about the second example , the sentence with with at the end of the sentence.
    – Peilin
    Mar 21 '19 at 0:39

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