0

Consider followings:

In recent years some new models have been proposed, each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

In recent years some new models have been proposed, each one having its own advantages and disadvantages.

I used "has" but my editor changed it to "having". Should really I use "having? Why? Can you explain it from grammar point of view?

  • Did you intend to write it as a complete sentence, or as a part of a longer sentence? – Damkerng T. Mar 30 '14 at 10:03
2

Essentially, you have two sentences:

In recent years some new models have been proposed.
Each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

Trying to combine the two into a single sentence with a comma is awkward. It's usually regarded as an error in technical writing. There are several ways to combine the two sentences. Here are some examples:

Using "and":

In recent years some new models have been proposed, and each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

Using a semicolon:

In recent years some new models have been proposed; each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

Using a participial clause (which is what your editor chose):

In recent years some new models have been proposed, each one having its own advantages and disadvantages.

Turning the second sentence into a participial clause allows the two ideas to stay together in the same sentence because a participial clause functions as an adverb (or an adverbial clause). To be precise, this is called an absolute clause. Also related: choster's answer.

  • I'm not a real fan of absolute clauses, so I pushed it too far, I guess. Thank you for the correction. – Damkerng T. Mar 30 '14 at 12:50
  • Good for you! (or Good on you!, I guess, in the Australian ambit). Absolute clauses must be used with great discretion, like habanero peppers. But this is not an absolute clause; it's an ordinary participle clause, having the same subject as its matrix clause. – StoneyB on hiatus Mar 30 '14 at 12:58
  • Thanks. I also find out this line really informative: myteacherpages.com/webpages/ewevodau/… – PHPst Mar 31 '14 at 4:55
0

The use of "having" is probably related to the part of the sentence preceding the one stated. It is more a question of wording rather than grammar.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.