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I am not sure about my use of the word crosscheck.

I have a sentence similar to:

To ensure the program correctness, we manually crosscheck the program's xyz function, and the product expiration and validation results, with results provided by the zzz program and the yyy tool, on a random sample of a few hundred products.

To clarify: I have a program which performs some functions. I compared the results of this program's functions against those provided by another program and tool. I want to say this is the way I used to test its correctness.

Is my sentence readable, correct, and conveys the meaning?

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Yes, this is a normal use of the term crosscheck. It is generally used in the form crosscheck A with B, or crosscheck A against B. In the case of with, it can mean comparing two methods of doing a calculation or processing data, or it can mean asking another person. For example:

We crosschecked the results of the calculator's trigonometric functions with three known-good models of calculator.
Bob has told me what happened at the meeting, but I want to crosscheck with Alice.

In the case of against, it can be comparing two methods, or checking a list or dataset to make sure the results are the same.

We crosschecked the results of the calculator's trigonometric functions against standard trig tables.

It can also be used without a specific source if you are just talking about the need to crosscheck, or if you are speaking to the person you are crosschecking with.

So, the software is now running without errors, but we still need to crosscheck its results.
Bob told me what happened at the meeting, but I just wanted to call you in order to crosscheck.

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