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In fact, he only claimed to be the first to coin the term “vacuum cleaner” for devices of this nature, which may explain why he is so credited. As we all know, the term “vacuum” is an inappropriate name, because there exists no vacuum in a vacuum cleaner.
Rather, (1)it is the air moving through a small hole into a closed container, as a result of air being blown out of the container by a fan on the inside. But I suppose a “rapid air movement in a closed container to create suction” cleaner would not sound as scientific or be as handy a name. Anyway, we are stuck with (2)it historically, and it is hard to find any references to “vacuum” prior to Booth.

What does it refer to each? Really confusing. .

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  • How does the title of your question related to the content? The content of the question doesn't mention participles or gerunds. Please edit the title
    – James K
    Mar 24, 2019 at 7:58

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Rather, it (what was called “vacuum”) is the air moving through a small hole into a closed container, as a result of air being blown out of the container by a fan on the inside.

Anyway, we are stuck with it (the term “vacuum”) historically, and it is hard to find any references to “vacuum” prior to Booth.

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  • Your whole answers was in the quotes. Perhaps it would be clearer to add some explanation beside the quotes.
    – James K
    Mar 24, 2019 at 8:26

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