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The Macmillan Dictionary entry for back up reads

  1. [intransitive/transitive] if traffic backs up, or if it is backed up, the vehicles are in a long line and waiting to continue moving

4a. if a toilet, sink, or drain backs up, or if it is backed up, water cannot flow through it because something is blocking it

4b. if a system backs up, or if it is backed up, it has slowed down or stopped working because there is too much of something for it to deal with

Here are these meanings common in American English? Are they used in daily life conversations?

  • I'm an American in NYC, and those usages are quite common. – Jeff Zeitlin Mar 26 at 18:57
  • @Jeff Zeitlin ,is it common to use: We're all backed up at work right now. (We're very busy. We have too much work!) – It's about English Mar 26 at 19:06
  • Yes, those usages are quite common. – Jeff Zeitlin Mar 26 at 19:17
  • I have quoted the entry; please do not expect community members to open a separate website and then search for the relevant text. Additionally, it would help if you indicated how you've attempted to research this, even something as simple as searching for "sink backed up" or "traffic backed up" on the web. – choster Mar 26 at 19:21
  • No @Jeff Zeitlin I meant the new sentence:: We're all backed up at work right now. (We're very busy. We have too much work!) [Is this usage,in this context common?] – It's about English Mar 26 at 19:34
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Using 'backed up' to mean something is experiencing a blockage or bottleneck is very common.

Take a look at Google's Ngram for some indication of popularity.

Some of these examples (eg 'work backed up') could mean 'backed up' in the sense of 'data saved in duplicate in case of computer errors'. However, as the comments show, the simple answer to you question is 'yes'.

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