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  1. Ramp A produces light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to it from battery A.
  2. Ramp B produces light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to it from battery B.

I am trying to combine the above two sentences I created. The following is a sentence I drafted:

Ramps A and B each produce light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to them respectively from batteries A and B.

It seems that this sentence is hard to understand.

1 Answer 1

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You are looking for:

Ramps A and B each produces light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to them from batteries A and B, respectively.

  • produce has to be in singular (because of "each");
  • battery has to be in plural (because there are two of them);
  • "respectively" is usually after the enumeration (but some exceptions may exist).

As you noticed, a more complex sentence is more difficult to understand than a simple one (or two simple ones).

Note (thanks to Jason Bassford): If you want to use "produce" in plural form, then you need to use "both" instead of "each":

Ramps A and B both produce light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to them from batteries A and B, respectively.

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  • Regarding the plural form, they are careless mistakes, so I corrected them.
    – rama9
    Mar 29, 2019 at 10:55
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    I was not aware of that. OK.
    – virolino
    Mar 29, 2019 at 10:57
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    @rama9 Each needs to be follows by a singular verb. It should be each produces, not each produce. (It produces, they produce.) Mar 29, 2019 at 13:54
  • @JasonBassford: I need some clarification for my own knowledge. I know that "Each of X, Y, Z..." requires verb in singular form. For some (twisted?) reason, the subject "X, Y, Z each..." should require plural, at least according to my ears. So, do you confirm that moving "each" after the enumeration still requires verb in singular? Thank you.
    – virolino
    Apr 1, 2019 at 5:12
  • I was not aware of me thinking "both", but your explanation makes total sense. With your permission, I will add this to the answer. Thank you.
    – virolino
    Apr 1, 2019 at 13:45

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