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I am not sure why, but I feel that there's something off with the expression "made it possible that". It really sounds ungrammatical, but I am not sure why I think that. It's a weird idiom. Anyway, are "made it possible that" and "made sure that" completely synonymous?

For example:

God in his wisdom has made it possible that all men may know him.

God in his wisdom has made sure that all men may know him.

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The expression, "made it possible that ..." is a common idiom.

Examples:

"Owning a car has made it possible that I show up for work on time every day."

"The micro-loan has made it possible that the village now has clean water to drink."

"Attaching a tracking device will make it possible that the vehicle will be recovered if it is stolen."

You can also say, "made it possible for ..."

Examples:

Owning a car has made it possible for me to show up for work on time every day.

The micro-loan has made it possible for the village to have clean water to drink.

Attaching a tracking device will make it possible for the vehicle to be recovered if it is stolen.

But, "made it possible that" and "made sure that" are not the same thing in general.

It's the difference between "sure" (i.e. "certain") and "possible" (not certain).

The particular example sentences you give, however, are pretty close in meaning because the verb is "may know", which in itself is about a possibility (the possibility of men knowing God).

So the first sentence actually has a sort of "double possibility":

God in his wisdom has made it possible that all men may [possibly] know him.

And your second example sentence also has an implied "possible" -- but just one:

God in his wisdom has made sure [certain] that all men may [possibly] know him.

So between the redundant two "possibles" in the first example, and the certainty of one "possible" in the second, both sentences mean essentially the same thing.

Usually though, "made possible" and "made sure" have different meanings.

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