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What is the meaning of "snuggled up warm" in the following sentence,

We were all cosy, snuggled up warm

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Does it mean "We were all cosy and we snuggled up and we were warm" ? or does it mean "We were all cosy and we snuggled up in order to be warm" ?

Can we use the adjective "warm" instead of a noun behind the preposition "up"?

Grammatically, I have thought nouns came after prepositions. But, I often have seen many sentences with adjectives after prepositions. Is there a rule to make a sentence like this?

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  • I think 'warm' is a complement here.
    – dan
    Commented Mar 31, 2019 at 10:43
  • If so, does it mean "We were all cosy and we snuggled up and we were warm" ? Can we place complements anywhere in the sentence even after prepositions?
    – user22046
    Commented Mar 31, 2019 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

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I'd understand this as "we were all cosy as a result of snuggling up warm".

My understanding is mostly pragmatic, based on my understanding of the situation. I know that snuggling results in being cosy, so regardless of any grammatical analysis, this must be the intended meaning.

I do agree that warm is a complement. It tells you what the person is.

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