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I know that "with a view to x" means "with the intent of doing something", but I am not sure if "with a view towards x" means the same thing. I couldn't find an entry for "with a view towards", so I was wondering if it was idiomatic and they both meant the same thing. I think there might be a slight difference in meaning, but I am not sure what it could be.

For example:

The military deployed soldiers in the region with a view to securing a critical asset.

The military deployed soldiers in the region with a view towards securing a critical asset.

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  • Yes, they both mean the same thing.
    – Robusto
    Apr 2, 2019 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

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They mean mostly the same thing.

Using "to" makes "securing a critical asset" as the only purpose of the deployment.

Using "towards", "securing a critical asset" loses some significance (as compared to being the only purpose), since other objectives might be pursued also.

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